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discusses his book "syria: the fall of the house of assad". >> thank youpa so much fors spending part of your afternoon with us here. behal myseuld like to welcome you all on behalf of david lesch and myself. this is a wonderful session.our. we're so happy they your here.ss i wanted to introduce david lesch to you. he is a professor of middle east history at trinity university iy san antonio.nker a prolific writer and thinker ot the middle east and what is t' happening in the region.e it's a treat to have him here today. he has written his new bookyriat "syria: the fall of the house of assad", which i'm hoping you you sign all purchase debt and assigned. again and sign my copy first. he has met extensively witheadi president assad and leading bete syrian officials.n the he has been in the middle east,, studying the middle east, makin, connections and reason that's he important is, of course, hee'son knows of what speaks. to write n without understanding the players, and lucky for us professor lesch knows quite a bit about what is happening in syria and can answer some of the very impo
group like in syria fighting fun government or they might be fighting a foreign occupation. in that respect, they are not representing an internationally recognized state but they are recognizing some kind of nation state or potential state. you could have conventional soldiers and these were the tactics may be operating out of uniform outside of the logistics training of conventional military using guerrilla tactics and booby traps and things like that. and for american citizens though are the projections different were stronger? >> okay so i would argue that in terms of human rights, people have the same set of human rights which include rights against arbitrary detention, rights against the abuse and to retain privacy and refuse personal questions asked by strangers. what i do think is different is the power of government different groups of people, so if you are a law enforcement agency you have more liberty to act in certain ways against citizens of your own country versus foreign citizens because there's a justification for the police to interrogate near you if they s
doesn't want the entire american south to be a teaming -- something like syria. that's not the goal that the confederates are after. they want to control the territory the way a proper nation state government can. and there are variety of reasons for that. social, cultural, slavery, a form of property that requires a basic level of social stability. as you see in the civil war, because slaves are property in this regime but the reality is they're always human beings and people and they can run away and do things of evading restriction in a way that physical property normally can't. so, the confederacy is always going to be unable really to really reliablily on guerrillas as the main effort because the point of that is to have an environment of social chaos. you also have -- i use this anecdote at the beginning of the book. the officers of the regular army have a lot of experience at irregular warfare. they haven't it from fighting indians. part of the cop sequence of the experience, people like lee have to chase indians in texas -- they actually have a powerful distaste for it. it's
into iraq through syria. but the database of 500 individuals that were recruited to blow themselves up was critical with the effort to take al qaeda at it is in mesopotamia apart inside iraq. >> the mother lode of documents seized that has been known as the sinjar parade illustrates the point* nicely made by lt. general lewis, or flynn six years after a 9/11 attacks that intelligence committees representing a wide variety of agencies, but notorious and secret, had been collaborating on the unprecedented capability to crush the terrorist networks. addition to the special ops they used supercomputers and custom software for deployed a skilled and list and to charge just about every type of intel into searchable data weather tips or documents from the old fashioned spy network, but transcripts from interrogation, logs of surveillance, monitoring, ce llphones and computers and the images and sensory readings hovering high and silent over potential targets for days or months or years. few of them are clearly related and they would previously remade headed a bank account shared by the hezbol
east, syria, north korea, china, and russia and so forth. i would imagine a considerably lower priority. eac n >> didew cuba policy wax and wae with each new administration? >> it did. the most fee roshes opposition was during the kennedy years. jack kennedy was really determined to cosomething about the cuba problem. he was obsessed. humiliated by castro at the bay of of pigs. was lyndon johnson came after kennedy, and his obsession was vietnam.pitously cuba. declined.r, subsequent presidents such as gerald ford, jimmy carter made serious efforts to acheech a, response with castro. quite the opposite what kennedy was doing.y comby has waxed and waned. it's been a different kind of priority over the fifty years e for ten or eleven american g presidents. >> onet theerer reverse side. it did they have good assets in the u.s.? has the castro regime tried to assassinate a u.s. president. >> i continue think that -- don't think that castro had a ai directns demand the assassinatin de plotri against the american t president. mo but i do describe in the book -- some of the most startling infor
, syria, the islamic republic of iran and the united states of america. well, harold coe says, what a disgrace. how can the united states be a world leader on women's rights and not sign this treaty? well, let's take a look. what would radification mean? we don't have to guess what ratification means. the american bar association has written a book-length report, 200 pages, explaining exactly what american compliance would mean. the aba report is based on the work of the u.n. monitoring committees. they go to the countries when they ratify the treaty. so when they went to britain or australia or canada, they wrote a report. what were they telling these countries to do, how would you follow the treaty? well, the aba report opposes thousands of questions, all of them potential lawsuits. the aba claims, first of all, it's not about equality under the law, it's about de facto equality; that is, equality of result, statistical equality. the aba states gender quotas are not voluntary, it creates an obligation for a quota system. so i'm just going to run through a few of these questions fr
would have legitimacy with the opposition back in syria itself. but there are some attempts and people are thinking about these things-perhaps because of what happened in iraq in 2003. >> wonderful. one more. yes, please. >> what this likelihood that the regime will use chemical weapons and what should we or could we do if they do? >> good question. that's one of the questions that no one has an answer, understand what circumstances would the regime use chemical weapons. i suspect they don't want to use them because that would galvanize the exact international response they're trying to avoid. the don't want this type of mass blood-letting that will compel the international community to intervene much more assertively than it has. so i don't think they're going to use chemical weapons. the fear is, though, if the regime -- if the opposition gains the upper hand, if the regime is on its last legs will they want to go down in flames or will they want to launch a chemical attack against israel, for instance, desperately trying to turn a domestic conflict into an arab israeli wa
and syria? what obligation to the french nation? it destroys our understanding of the term and weakens us as a citizen. since then according to greatest access of prosperity but history have been in decline this is inevitable and nothing lasts forever. one may be a healthy age to find the straight to reasonably consider the options this is designed to make a moral choice between two flawed and alternatives. if we do not have that choice to weaken the power of the american electorate. it is our country to enjoy as long as we choose. thank you. [applause] >> i think that i talked to long. >> we have a few questions. please wait for the microphone. we will start here. >> thank you very much for the thoughtful address. talk about hollywood culture , it is political to some degree. in the 53 had reagan and hollywood to do rehab robert redford, barbara streisand. what is the dynamic? are there any other signs in your career that it might be redirected? >> if you look at the people trying to save the world the phrase then hollywood was the soul so dead so those are saying the overall so that th
tell you something. that is the biggest battle on this planet which is not about syria. it's not about pakistan. that sailing ship is the naval action of the biggest battle on this planet. paul the vulture singer, and romney are co romney has a piece of it. a small piece but you know a couple hundred million. a small piece. these vultures have attacked the nation of argentina saying that all the money that argentina once owned many years ago, new york banks -- do we care about the story oh argentine bank. argentine defaulted. no they didn't. they said we are not paying you a serious raid and if they did well and they did because they were not being killed, we will give you peace of argentina. they have citibank in jpmorgan and we have stock in argentina which was doing very well and then call the vulture singer swooped down and said that's fine just like he did with delphi and the auto parts. i have got you by the parts in detroit and now i have you in argentina. he doesn't want to just bring the argentine economy to its knees. he wants to bring united bank of switzerland, citibank, jp
, syria, iran. that's where we want the united states to be so you try to injure someone in ten seconds and you have to go to the web site and do this and that. so yes it is difficult on that score but as far as the answer to your question i don't think if you organize the general opposition but if you can wait for the big items to come up, currently there is an initiative in california launched by the american bar association to promote the international criminal court and to get the u.s. to join the international criminal court and they are paying for members of the court to come here and meet with american judges. they see this as a long-term process. this is a long-term thing even after they die they hope this is a goal that they will someday reach and we should look at that in protecting the american republic and sometimes it is disturbing to people on our side that says, i mean those that would like to see the american republic survive as long as it possibly can. nothing is forever, so this republic is also not going to last forever. i don't know if that is true because we don't k
into iraq through syria, and the possession of this data base of 5 # 00 individuals who were recruitedded to blow themselves up or arrange for terrorist attacks was critical in the effort to take al-qaeda apart inside of iraq, and i'll read you what i wrote here in the prologue. the motherload of documents seized in what has become known as the sinjar raid illustrated the point nicely. the point made by lieutenant general flynn. in the six years after the 9/11 attacks, the u.s. military and intelligence communities representing a wide variety of agencies, large and small, those notorious and those secret, had been collaborating on an unprecedented capability for crushing terrorist networks. in addition to the skills of the talented special operators, the effort used super computers and custom software, forward deployment of skilled analysts, the ability to turn just about every kind of intel into searchable data whether tips or documents from old-fashioned human spy networks, transcripts of detainees in interrogations, logs of electronic surveillance, monitoring, communications between ce
filtered into iraq through syria and the possession of this database, 500 individuals who blow themselves up or arrange for a terrorist attack was critical in the effort to take out qaeda in mesopotamia apart. the mother lode of documents seized from what has become know as the singe our raid illustrates the point nicely. the point being the one made by lieutenant general lewis or flame. in the six years after the 9/11 attacks, the u.s. military representing a wide variety of agencies, large and small, and those victorious in the secret had been collaborating on an unprecedented capability for crushing terrorist networks. in addition to skills of talented special operators the effort uses supercomputers and custom software, skilled analysts the ability to turn every kind of intel into searchable data weather tips or documents from old spy networks, transcripts, lots of electronic surveillance, monitoring coming communication between cell phones and computers are the images and sensor readings gathered by jones hovering high and silent over potential targets for days, weeks, months or year
the obvious higher priorities, iran, the middle east, syria, north korea, china, russia, and so forth. i would imagine considerably lower priority. >> did cuba policy wax and wean with each new administration? >> it did. it did. the most ferocious opposition was in the kennedy years. jack kennedy, as i said, was really determined to do something about the cuba problem. he was obsessed. hue millñhr -- huh mill -- humiliated by castro in the bay of pigs. kennedy's obsession was vietnam so cuba declined precipitously. presidents like ford, carter, made very serious efforts to achieve that with fidel castro, the opposite of what kennedy was doing, and so, yes, cuba maxed and waned. a different kind of priority over the 50 years for 10 or 11 american presidents. >> on the reverse side, does cuba have good assets? did cuba have good assets in the u.s.? has the castro regime tried to assassinate a u.s. president? >> i don't think castro ever had a direct hand in an assassination plot against an american president, but i describe in the book some of the most startling information i acquired from cuba
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13